Bioprinting for Bone Regeneration with Nanofiber Coated Tubular Scaffolds

Researchers from both Mexico and Costa Rica have joined efforts to further research into bone regeneration via bioprinting, allowing doctors and surgeons to create patient-specific scaffolds for improved treatment. 3D printing and tissue engineering show great promise for scientists because of the opportunity to build complex geometries, with precision. All the classic benefits of 3D printing are enjoyed during these experiments too, like affordability, speed in production, and best of all—the ability to create on-demand in the lab, manufacturing and making changes to structures in a completely self-sustained fashion.

The team of researchers detail their findings further in ‘Biocompatibility of Developing 3D Printed Tubular Scaffold Coated with Nanofibers for Bone Applications’ explaining how bone scaffolds can be improved further with an added composite layer that creates a layer more conducive to cell attachment and uniform seeding. To create these scaffolds, the team used a unique air jet spinning (AJS) technique, featuring a specialized spinning system nozzle and a surface for collecting polymer fibers and compressed gas—and they also 3D printed tubular scaffolds with PLA, featuring ‘submicrometric fiber surface coating in the biological response of human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB).’

This new method uses both the inner core of the PLA 3D printing material and the outer layer of its nanofibers, with the researchers using Cura software for internal geometries and a MakerMex 3D printer to manufacture the tubular structures. The dual technique allowed the team to create a fiber layer dispersion resulting in a surface with ‘homogeneous thickness distribution’ and nanofibers adapting well to merging with the 3D printed scaffold. Adhesion was noted as ‘very strong,’ with the composites showing an increase in thermal stability, and the coating imbuing the tubular scaffold with properties critical to tissue engineering for bone regeneration.

“The 3D surface of the printed tubular scaffold exhibited distinctive morphologies and structures analyzed by SEM, and the surface roughness of the tubular scaffolds increased with the incorporation of the coating functionalization by the fiber membrane,” concluded the authors.

By Bridget O’Neal | 3DPRINT.COM

Image Source/Credit: Biocompatibility of Developing 3D Printed Tubular Scaffold Coated with Nanofibers for Bone Applications

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About Peter Coffaro 662 Articles
A growth-driven and strategic executive, Peter Coffaro commands more than 20 years of progressive management success within the orthopedic industry. Recognized by MedReps.com as one of the top medical sales influencers in the industry; he has 10 years of combined sales management experience and has held positions as a Director, General Manager and Distributor. Peter has worked for some of the top orthopedic companies in the world - Zimmer, DePuy and Stryker. He is also the founder of OrthoFeed: a popular blog that covers orthopedic news and emerging medical technologies. Peter is a three-time Hall of Fame award winner at Johnson and Johnson and has an extensive background in organizational development, business development, sales management, digital marketing and professional education. Peter holds a B.S. degree in Biology from Northern Illinois University.

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