Robotics

Here are 28 things to know from the largest orthopedic companies

Posted on

8116082155_ef9a1afa92_oIn an exciting year for healthcare, orthopedic device companies underwent mergers and acquisitions, strove to find the most innovative solutions and made calculated decisions in the hopes of achieving long-term success as the market becomes increasingly competitive. So who had the best 2016?

By  Adam Schrag | Becker’s Spine Review

READ MORE

The top medtech stories of early 2017

Posted on Updated on

Trump-inaugural-speechThe new Trump administration and Republican Congress – and all the accompanying change and uncertainty – is the major story for the medical device industry.

But there are many other medtech stories worth noting from the first quarter of 2017. There was an FDA warning over Abbott’s Absorb bioresorbable stent, a continued spate of M&A deals, a slew of cardiology research breakthroughs including a customizable robotic heart out of Harvard, and much more.

Here are the top medical device stories of early 2017.

BY Chris Newmarker | MassDevice

Image Credit: White House

READ MORE

Dr. Matthew Hummel does total knee replacement at St. E using new robotic-arm technology

Posted on

Mako_Robot_TKA_NEW-0Dr. Matthew T. Hummel of Commonwealth Orthopaedic Centers performed the first total knee replacement surgery using new robotic-arm assisted technology at St. Elizabeth Healthcare — technology available at only a handful of medical centers in the nation.

Today’s successful surgery was performed using a device called the Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery System. The surgeon’s use of the robotic-arm system brings exceptional accuracy to the surgery — which can mean the patient has a much better result, with more natural movement and less pain after the surgery.

Together with highly detailed computerized scans of the knee before surgery, the robotic arm-assisted device ensures incredibly accurate cuts for the surgery, along with precise alignment and placement of the knee implant. The device allows for accuracy within a single millimeter, or the thickness of a thread.

“I think our ability to use this advanced technology can really change the world for our patients who need this type of surgery,” Hummel said. “With our surgical expertise and with this equipment, this surgery can now be performed with exceptional accuracy, providing better results for patients.”

By Northern Kentucky Tribune

Image Credit: Stryker

READ MORE

Are Surgical Robots the Future or Just a Fad?

Posted on Updated on

ROSA-robotSurgical robots dominated the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons as Stryker launched its highly anticipated Mako total knee application, Smith & Nephew showed off a prototype of its Navio total knee application (with a projected launch of mid-2017), and Zimmer Biomet announced an aggressive timetable for launching its Rosa total knee application within the next 18 months.

All the hype surrounding robotics begs the question, do these robots represent the future standard of care in orthopedics, or are they just a fad?

“We think robotics are real and here to stay,” said Mike Matson, an analyst with Needham & Co. “But the tougher question is, just how big will it get?”

Matson said he does not expect robotics to break out of its niche and become the standard of care. He also predicted that adoption of surgical robots could be slower than some investors are anticipating.

“Has robotics addressed the difficulties of navigation (ease of use, learning curve, added time, etc)? We’re not convinced that it has, at least in its current form,” Matson said.

On the other hand, Matson said patients seem to have an easier time grasping the concept of robotics than navigation, which should make consumer marketing more effective. Still, he added, “we’re not sure that this is enough to make robotics the standard of care.”

By Amanda Pedersen | Qmed

Image Credit: Zimmer Biomet

READ MORE

The Hottest Products at AAOS 2017

Posted on

robotics-mako-homeThese new orthopedic products generated a lot of buzz at last week’s meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

The annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is an opportunity for orthopedics companies to showcase their latest, greatest innovations for customers. At this year’s event in San Diego, the following products especially caught analysts’ eye.

By Jamie Hartford | Qmed

Image Credit: Stryker

READ MORE

Robotic legs give the paralyzed a new view of their world

Posted on Updated on

C7KEyFAVoAAI6xHArthur Renowitzky can’t help but command attention as he walks down the street on a sunny autumn morning.

A driver lowers her window to flash a smile and a thumbs-up. “You got this,” she says. A neighbor waves from his front yard. “Go get ’em A.R.”

Renowitzky has been paralyzed since 2007 after being shot in the chest for $20 and a fake gold chain. But he can stand and walk, using crutches for balance, when wearing an exoskeleton suit with motorized hips and knees powering his movements.

Wearable robots aren’t new. DARPA has been funding their development since the early 2000s with the aim of building motorized armor to enhance soldiers’ strength and endurance. Panasonic, Ekso Bionics and others offer upper-body suits that help construction and factory workers lift heavy loads. But their most powerful promise may be in helping people regain control of their bodies.

By  | c|net

Image Credit: c|net

READ MORE

The robotic have-not: How J&J plans to woo hospitals, knee surgeons

Posted on

GettyImages-165533204-600x426Johnson & Johnson and Verily Life Sciences (formerly Google Life Sciences) have a joint venture to create the next generation of robotic surgery souped up with digital technologies in the future. (Watch out Intuitive Surgical.)

But when it comes to hip and knee replacement today, J&J Depuy Synthes is a robotic have-not.

Competitors have robots or are close to having something robotic in joint replacement.

On Tuesday, Stryker launched its total knee application on the expensive Mako robotduring the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons in San Diego. That same day at AAOS, Smith & Nephew previewed its hand-held robot-assisted device for total knee replacements in advance of a market release in the second quarter. And Zimmer-Biomet was also proudly displaying its robot on the exhibit floor — the Rosa robot acquired with the purchase of French firm Medtech SA – although the robot won’t be doing total knee replacements until 2018.

By Arundhati Parmar | MedCity News

Image Credit: Getty Images

READ MORE