Medical Devices

Judge moves Stryker-DJO Global poaching case to Indiana

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stryker-djo-7x4-700x400A federal judge in New Jersey yesterday transferred a sales rep poaching case between DJO Global and Stryker (NYSE:SYK) to Indiana because the quintet of ex-Stryker sales reps involved live there and most of the events in th case occurred in the Hoosier State.

The lawsuit, originally filed in April 2016 in the U.S. District Court for New Jersey, alleged a scheme by DJO and the former Stryker sales reps – Kywin Supernaw, Brad Bolinger, Justin Davis, Jake Eisterhold, Eric Huebner and Tim Broecker – that took a roughly 33% bite out of Stryker’s ortho & trauma sales in Indiana in 2015.

In June 2016 DJO and the reps fired back, asking Judge John Michael Vazquez to dismiss the case for lack of evidence, or alternatively to shift it to the U.S. District Court for Southern Indiana. Yesterday Vazquez granted the motions to relocate the case, according to court documents.

By Brad Perriello |  MassDevice

Image Credit: MassDevice

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Here are 28 things to know from the largest orthopedic companies

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8116082155_ef9a1afa92_oIn an exciting year for healthcare, orthopedic device companies underwent mergers and acquisitions, strove to find the most innovative solutions and made calculated decisions in the hopes of achieving long-term success as the market becomes increasingly competitive. So who had the best 2016?

By  Adam Schrag | Becker’s Spine Review

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Dr. Matthew Hummel does total knee replacement at St. E using new robotic-arm technology

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Mako_Robot_TKA_NEW-0Dr. Matthew T. Hummel of Commonwealth Orthopaedic Centers performed the first total knee replacement surgery using new robotic-arm assisted technology at St. Elizabeth Healthcare — technology available at only a handful of medical centers in the nation.

Today’s successful surgery was performed using a device called the Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery System. The surgeon’s use of the robotic-arm system brings exceptional accuracy to the surgery — which can mean the patient has a much better result, with more natural movement and less pain after the surgery.

Together with highly detailed computerized scans of the knee before surgery, the robotic arm-assisted device ensures incredibly accurate cuts for the surgery, along with precise alignment and placement of the knee implant. The device allows for accuracy within a single millimeter, or the thickness of a thread.

“I think our ability to use this advanced technology can really change the world for our patients who need this type of surgery,” Hummel said. “With our surgical expertise and with this equipment, this surgery can now be performed with exceptional accuracy, providing better results for patients.”

By Northern Kentucky Tribune

Image Credit: Stryker

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Are Surgical Robots the Future or Just a Fad?

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ROSA-robotSurgical robots dominated the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons as Stryker launched its highly anticipated Mako total knee application, Smith & Nephew showed off a prototype of its Navio total knee application (with a projected launch of mid-2017), and Zimmer Biomet announced an aggressive timetable for launching its Rosa total knee application within the next 18 months.

All the hype surrounding robotics begs the question, do these robots represent the future standard of care in orthopedics, or are they just a fad?

“We think robotics are real and here to stay,” said Mike Matson, an analyst with Needham & Co. “But the tougher question is, just how big will it get?”

Matson said he does not expect robotics to break out of its niche and become the standard of care. He also predicted that adoption of surgical robots could be slower than some investors are anticipating.

“Has robotics addressed the difficulties of navigation (ease of use, learning curve, added time, etc)? We’re not convinced that it has, at least in its current form,” Matson said.

On the other hand, Matson said patients seem to have an easier time grasping the concept of robotics than navigation, which should make consumer marketing more effective. Still, he added, “we’re not sure that this is enough to make robotics the standard of care.”

By Amanda Pedersen | Qmed

Image Credit: Zimmer Biomet

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The Hottest Products at AAOS 2017

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robotics-mako-homeThese new orthopedic products generated a lot of buzz at last week’s meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

The annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is an opportunity for orthopedics companies to showcase their latest, greatest innovations for customers. At this year’s event in San Diego, the following products especially caught analysts’ eye.

By Jamie Hartford | Qmed

Image Credit: Stryker

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Study points a way to better implants

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MIT-Prevent-Fibrosis_0Medical devices implanted in the body for drug delivery, sensing, or tissue regeneration usually come under fire from the host’s immune system. Defense cells work to isolate material they consider foreign to the body, building up a wall of dense scar tissue around the devices, which eventually become unable to perform their functions.

Researchers at MIT and Boston Children’s Hospital have identified a signaling molecule that is key to this process of “fibrosis,” and they have shown that blocking the molecule prevents the scar tissue from forming. The findings, reported in the March 20 issue of Nature Materials, could help scientists extend the lifespan of many types of implantable medical devices.

By Anne Trafton | MIT News

Image Credit: Felice Frankel

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The biggest takeaway from the annual meeting of orthopedic surgeons (AAOS)

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C64mqD6U8AEooUc (2)If you walked through the sprawling exhibit floor of the San Diego Convention Center last week, you would have noticed products galore. Mannequins being pretend treated on hospital beds, and all kinds of medical devices being touted for surgeons and other buyers.

And yet the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons was less about rods and screws and the latest techniques in surgery, and more about bundled care and the shift from volume to value. And this despite the fact that the Trump administration appointees are putting a temporary pause on programs that expand or implement bundled care.

This is an important shift given that device vendors in the past would dazzle surgeons with the latest technologies as physician preference and large egos would rule hospital purchasing decisions. All of it without a thought placed on how much those shiny objects cost.

And now the pendulum has swung to where device manufacturers are casting themselves as partners to help solve hospital’s problems.

By Arundhati Parmar | MedCity News

Image Credit: AAOS

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