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robotic surgery

Here are 28 things to know from the largest orthopedic companies

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8116082155_ef9a1afa92_oIn an exciting year for healthcare, orthopedic device companies underwent mergers and acquisitions, strove to find the most innovative solutions and made calculated decisions in the hopes of achieving long-term success as the market becomes increasingly competitive. So who had the best 2016?

By  Adam Schrag | Becker’s Spine Review

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Dr. Matthew Hummel does total knee replacement at St. E using new robotic-arm technology

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Mako_Robot_TKA_NEW-0Dr. Matthew T. Hummel of Commonwealth Orthopaedic Centers performed the first total knee replacement surgery using new robotic-arm assisted technology at St. Elizabeth Healthcare — technology available at only a handful of medical centers in the nation.

Today’s successful surgery was performed using a device called the Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery System. The surgeon’s use of the robotic-arm system brings exceptional accuracy to the surgery — which can mean the patient has a much better result, with more natural movement and less pain after the surgery.

Together with highly detailed computerized scans of the knee before surgery, the robotic arm-assisted device ensures incredibly accurate cuts for the surgery, along with precise alignment and placement of the knee implant. The device allows for accuracy within a single millimeter, or the thickness of a thread.

“I think our ability to use this advanced technology can really change the world for our patients who need this type of surgery,” Hummel said. “With our surgical expertise and with this equipment, this surgery can now be performed with exceptional accuracy, providing better results for patients.”

By Northern Kentucky Tribune

Image Credit: Stryker

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Are Surgical Robots the Future or Just a Fad?

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ROSA-robotSurgical robots dominated the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons as Stryker launched its highly anticipated Mako total knee application, Smith & Nephew showed off a prototype of its Navio total knee application (with a projected launch of mid-2017), and Zimmer Biomet announced an aggressive timetable for launching its Rosa total knee application within the next 18 months.

All the hype surrounding robotics begs the question, do these robots represent the future standard of care in orthopedics, or are they just a fad?

“We think robotics are real and here to stay,” said Mike Matson, an analyst with Needham & Co. “But the tougher question is, just how big will it get?”

Matson said he does not expect robotics to break out of its niche and become the standard of care. He also predicted that adoption of surgical robots could be slower than some investors are anticipating.

“Has robotics addressed the difficulties of navigation (ease of use, learning curve, added time, etc)? We’re not convinced that it has, at least in its current form,” Matson said.

On the other hand, Matson said patients seem to have an easier time grasping the concept of robotics than navigation, which should make consumer marketing more effective. Still, he added, “we’re not sure that this is enough to make robotics the standard of care.”

By Amanda Pedersen | Qmed

Image Credit: Zimmer Biomet

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The Hottest Products at AAOS 2017

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robotics-mako-homeThese new orthopedic products generated a lot of buzz at last week’s meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

The annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is an opportunity for orthopedics companies to showcase their latest, greatest innovations for customers. At this year’s event in San Diego, the following products especially caught analysts’ eye.

By Jamie Hartford | Qmed

Image Credit: Stryker

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The robotic have-not: How J&J plans to woo hospitals, knee surgeons

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GettyImages-165533204-600x426Johnson & Johnson and Verily Life Sciences (formerly Google Life Sciences) have a joint venture to create the next generation of robotic surgery souped up with digital technologies in the future. (Watch out Intuitive Surgical.)

But when it comes to hip and knee replacement today, J&J Depuy Synthes is a robotic have-not.

Competitors have robots or are close to having something robotic in joint replacement.

On Tuesday, Stryker launched its total knee application on the expensive Mako robotduring the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons in San Diego. That same day at AAOS, Smith & Nephew previewed its hand-held robot-assisted device for total knee replacements in advance of a market release in the second quarter. And Zimmer-Biomet was also proudly displaying its robot on the exhibit floor — the Rosa robot acquired with the purchase of French firm Medtech SA – although the robot won’t be doing total knee replacements until 2018.

By Arundhati Parmar | MedCity News

Image Credit: Getty Images

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Scientists want to define just how smart robot surgeons are

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dimsFor roughly three decades, medical robots have assisted surgeons in the operating theater. They provide a steady hand and can make tiny incisions with pinpoint accuracy. But as robotics improve, a new question has emerged: How should autonomous robots be treated? The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves medical devices, while medical societies monitor doctors. A robot that can operate on its own falls somewhere in between. To help, Science Robotics has produced a scale for grading autonomy in robot-assisted surgery. If adopted, it could help regulators decide when and how machines should be treated like humans.

By Nick Summers | engadget

Image Credit: Frank Perry/Getty Images

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Zimmer Biomet shoots for robot-assisted total knee release next year

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zblogoZimmer Biomet (NYSE:ZBH) expects to launch a robot-assisted surgery platform for total knee procedures during the 2nd half of 2018, the company said this week at the annual conference of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons in San Diego.

A prototype of the device, on display at the AOSS conference, is based on the Rosa technology Zimmer Biomet acquired when it put up $132 million for Medtech in July 2016. Montpellier, France-based Medtech developed the Rosa Brain and Rosa Spine robot-assisted surgery platforms; the Rosa Spine device won 510(k) clearance from the FDA early last year. Both Rosa systems have CE Mark approval in the European Union.

Zimmer Biomet is hoping to land 510(k) approval from the FDA for a Rosa device for total knee procedures by the 2nd half of 2018, according to Leerink Partners analyst Richard Newitter. The company will also pursue 510(k) clearance for partial knee and hip indications, Newitter wrote today in a note to investors.

By Brad Perriello | MassDevice

Image Credit: Zimmer Biomet

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