surgical planning

Stratasys introduce 3D printers to hospitals in five states to help US veterans

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140114113712-military-pensions-disabled-veterans-620xa-906x565In an agreement with the US Department of Veterans Affairs Center for Innovation (VACI), Israeli 3D printer manufacturer Stratasys (NASDAQ:SSYS) is installing 3D printers in five Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals around the nation. The 3D printers will be used to help plan surgical operations, train medical students, and produce functional prosthesis for patients in need.

The project is part of Stratasys’ Corporate Social Responsibility that “is aimed at ingraining the power of 3D printing across young minds, bringing transformative medical and educational programs to underprivileged communities, and creating life-changing impacts for the people who need it most.”

By Beau Jackson | 3D Printing Industry

Photo Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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Microsoft’s HoloLens: How these surgeons can now voyage around patients’ organs

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oslohololensaUsing Microsoft’s HoloLens platform, researchers in Oslo have developed a way of turning traditional two-dimensional medical images into 3D augmented-reality models for planning surgery and navigating around organs during operations.

The project by researchers at the Intervention Centre at Oslo University Hospital, working with developers at IT consultancy Sopra Steria, was recently awarded a Microsoft Health Innovation Award.

The data that the 3D models use comes from the hospital’s various image-generating scanning CT and MR machines. These scanners provide detailed views of the human body, but present these images in the form of two-dimensional picture ‘slices’.

When planning surgical procedures, the surgeons have to flip back and forth through a potentially large number of these slices, when using them directly from the scanning machines.

By  | ZDNet

Image Credit: Hanne Kristine Fjellheim/Sopra Steria

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What You Need to Know About Virtual Reality in Healthcare

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VirtualReality703-703x437You’ve heard of virtual reality, maybe you’ve even tried Google Cardboard, but the world of augmented and mixed reality is still a mystery, as is its potential impact on healthcare delivery. Justin Barad breaks down what physicians need to know.

In 2012 a Kickstarter launched for a virtual reality headset called the Oculus Rift. The campaign raised $2.4 million – shooting past its $250,000 goal. What started as a garage-based pet project has turned into a worldwide phenomenon and two new computing platforms: Virtual and augmented reality. The market for virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) is projected to reach $160 billion by 2020. One of the major useful applications for this technology is in the area of healthcare. In this article, I will try and list a few of the interesting uses of VR and AR in medicine which I have broken down into therapeutics, visualization, surgical navigation, patient education, training, telepresence, telementoring, and workflow/EMR-integration.

By Justin Barad | Telemedicine Magazine

Image Credit: Osso VR

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How virtual reality is shaping the healthcare industry

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VR HealthcareOne of the most common misconceptions is that Virtual Reality is just for entertainment.

However, researchers, doctors and scientists from across the world have been exploring the use of VR in military and healthcare for decades. This accumulation of data has since exploded with the universal funding and adoption Virtual Reality is receiving from giants in the industry.

In turn this makes VR more affordable and accessible to the mass market, once a very big factor holding the technology back holding it back. We’re going to explore Virtual Reality in the healthcare industry and how it’s shaping the future for people across the world.

By VR BOUND

Illustration Credit: VR BOUND

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3D Printing Orthopedic Solutions — Where are we? An Update.

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1-61bvtpvipel3dtujnbb_zgHealthcare is rapidly changing and by this, I mean that the technology of delivery and care is advancing faster than the providers, the insurers and the patients can keep up. We are going to be seeing a remarkable transformation over the next few decades that will benefit patients most, and much of this is due to advances in 3D printing.

Now, some of this already exists today. There are prototypes built everyday by manufacturers using this technology for research and development but only a handful have fully embraced this technology in medical device implantation for patients. For example, there are cutting jigs that are designed and printed based off the patient’s individual anatomy that act as guides for the surgeon to define bone margins and planned cuts or alignment principles during orthopedic surgery. Commonly, a CT scan of the patient’s bones and joints is visualized with landmarks identified that plot the proposed positions and cuts the surgeon is going to make to accommodate for the proposed implant. This can theoretically and practically simplify complex procedures in to a ‘paint by numbers’ solution.

By Dr. Faisal Mirza | 3DHeals

Photo Credit: Jairo Alzate

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A review of recent medical advances using 3D printing and 3D bioprinting

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skull-906x6792x3D Printing Industry reviews recent real world examples of 3D bioprinting and additive manufacturing methods in medicine.

The use of 3D printing for surgical planning took another step forward recently, we look at the use of 3D printing for surgical planning by 3D Systems. We also see how 3D printed bone matter and cartilage for regenerative medicine research is progressing. And finally, we get to the heart of discoveries with 3D printed vascular tissue, returning to China’s macaque monkeys who received effective implant of a 3D printed vein.

By Beau Jackson | 3D Printing Industry

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3D Printed Models in the Operating Room: 3D Systems Brings Technology to Surgeons

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dr-goodrich-model-officeThanks to 3D modeling and 3D printing technologies, we are seeing advances in cases that have a direct impact on individual lives — increasingly appearing thanks to advances in surgical capabilities. Cooperation between facilities like 3D Systems‘ advanced Healthcare Technology Center in Littleton, Colorado and operating rooms in world-class hospitals is leading to more prepared surgeons and better informed patients and families.

A case that has held the interest of many over recent months, CNN has been reporting with unprecedented OR access on the case of twins Jadon and Anias McDonald, twin boys born conjoined at the brain. In the Children’s Hospital of Montefiore (CHAM) operating room alongside the surgical team and CNN team were two additional observers, present from 3D Systems and there to see 3D printed models put to use directly alongside the patients.

By  | 3DPrint

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