medical device

Judge moves Stryker-DJO Global poaching case to Indiana

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stryker-djo-7x4-700x400A federal judge in New Jersey yesterday transferred a sales rep poaching case between DJO Global and Stryker (NYSE:SYK) to Indiana because the quintet of ex-Stryker sales reps involved live there and most of the events in th case occurred in the Hoosier State.

The lawsuit, originally filed in April 2016 in the U.S. District Court for New Jersey, alleged a scheme by DJO and the former Stryker sales reps – Kywin Supernaw, Brad Bolinger, Justin Davis, Jake Eisterhold, Eric Huebner and Tim Broecker – that took a roughly 33% bite out of Stryker’s ortho & trauma sales in Indiana in 2015.

In June 2016 DJO and the reps fired back, asking Judge John Michael Vazquez to dismiss the case for lack of evidence, or alternatively to shift it to the U.S. District Court for Southern Indiana. Yesterday Vazquez granted the motions to relocate the case, according to court documents.

By Brad Perriello |  MassDevice

Image Credit: MassDevice

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Are Surgical Robots the Future or Just a Fad?

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ROSA-robotSurgical robots dominated the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons as Stryker launched its highly anticipated Mako total knee application, Smith & Nephew showed off a prototype of its Navio total knee application (with a projected launch of mid-2017), and Zimmer Biomet announced an aggressive timetable for launching its Rosa total knee application within the next 18 months.

All the hype surrounding robotics begs the question, do these robots represent the future standard of care in orthopedics, or are they just a fad?

“We think robotics are real and here to stay,” said Mike Matson, an analyst with Needham & Co. “But the tougher question is, just how big will it get?”

Matson said he does not expect robotics to break out of its niche and become the standard of care. He also predicted that adoption of surgical robots could be slower than some investors are anticipating.

“Has robotics addressed the difficulties of navigation (ease of use, learning curve, added time, etc)? We’re not convinced that it has, at least in its current form,” Matson said.

On the other hand, Matson said patients seem to have an easier time grasping the concept of robotics than navigation, which should make consumer marketing more effective. Still, he added, “we’re not sure that this is enough to make robotics the standard of care.”

By Amanda Pedersen | Qmed

Image Credit: Zimmer Biomet

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How surgical robots are creating super surgeons

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512056672_largeIn many industries, the advance of robotics has created worries about robots supplanting humans. But in the world of surgery, the next generation of robotics is set to do the opposite—to supercharge the surgeon and put him in control as never before.

Intuitive Surgical’s da Vinci system defined the first generation of general surgical robotics. It promised a revolution in surgery and is today used for hundreds of thousands of procedures annually. The da Vinci System “is powered by robotic technology that allows the surgeon’s hand movements to be translated into smaller, precise movements of tiny instruments inside the patient’s body,” according to the company. The surgeon is provided with a high-definition, 3D window on the operative world through a laparoscope also operated by one of the robot’s arms. Characteristics of first-generation robotic surgery systems include the large size and physical dominance of the operating room, the placing of the surgeon into a console outside the sterile field, and surgeons receiving feedback limited mostly to visual cues on-screen.

By  | MassDevice

Image Credit: Intuitive Surgical

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U.S. med tech sector lost 28,000+ jobs under med device tax: AdvaMed

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capitol-senateWhen the medical device excise tax was in effect, the med tech industry lost nearly 29,000, or 7.2%, of its jobs, according to an AdvaMed analysis of Department of Commerce figures. The drop occurred between 2012, the year before the tax was enacted, and 2015, when it was suspended in a tax and spending bill.

“These numbers reveal just how devastating of an impact the device tax had on our industry and underscore the urgent need for permanent repeal,” said AdvaMed CEO Scott Whitaker, in a statement. “At a time when American device manufacturers are ready to grow and create jobs, the best message this Congress and the Administration can send is through a full and permanent repeal.”

By Amirah Al Idrus | FierceBiotech

Image Credit: FierceBiotech

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Medtronic gets FDA clearance for cardiac-mapping vest

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screen-shot-2017-02-06-at-11-17-55-amFiguring out what is causing an irregular heartbeat typically means an invasive procedure: most often, electrophysiologists insert a catheter to the heart via an artery or vein to get a cardiac “map” and identify the origin of the arrhythmia. But a new device from Medtronic takes the process outside, in the form of a sensor-enabled vest.

Dubbed the CardioInsight Noninvasive 3D Mapping System, the single-use, disposable wearable received FDA 510(k) clearance last week, following a predecessor system that was used in more than 1,600 patients. In addition to having the benefit of being non-invasive, the vest may also give physicians more insights, as it can be worn long enough to catch transient arrhythmias that could otherwise be missed on a one-time ECG test.

By Heather Mack | mobihealth news

Image Credit: Medtronic

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Under Trump, Congress likely to pull plug on medical device tax

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U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks at the USA Thank You Tour event at the Iowa Events Center in Des Moines, IowaWhen Donald Trump takes over as president on Jan. 20, one of the first business tax breaks he delivers is likely to go to the U.S. medical device industry and companies like Mark Throdahl’s.

The chief executive of OrthoPediatrics Corp, based in northern Indiana, said his company has been able to hire more workers since the temporary suspension effective last January of a federal tax on medical devices. The tax was imposed as part of outgoing President Barack Obama’s signature 2010 healthcare law.

Throdahl said he hopes the incoming Republican-led Congress and president will permanently repeal the tax.

Trump and U.S. lawmakers are likely to do that, according to lawmakers, lobbyists and industry executives, in a step that also would help larger medical device makers such as Medtronic Inc, Boston Scientific, St. Jude Medical Inc and Johnson & Johnson.

By Nick Carey & Susan Cornwell | Reuters

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Wearable medical device market reaches $13 billion

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medical-wearablesThe global wearable medical device market is valued at just more than $13.2 billion for 2016, per Kalorama Information. The wearable technology industry, in general, is continuing to expand and healthcare is no exception. In fact, healthcare is among the fastest growing segments for wearables due to the overwhelming need to monitor diseases and aging populations. The healthcare market research firm’s report, “The Market for Wearable Devices,” examines the global market, providing market size and forecasts.

Wearable devices are no longer just focusing on one measurement – such as the number of steps taken in a day – but are focusing on a variety of bodily measurements such as heart rate, breathing, blood pressure and many others. Advances in wearable medical devices include new miniaturized sensors; peripherals; real-time measurements and interactions, wireless communication, sort-and-analyze features, portability and data transfer capabilities.

By Today’s Medical Developments

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