3D Printing

Here are 28 things to know from the largest orthopedic companies

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8116082155_ef9a1afa92_oIn an exciting year for healthcare, orthopedic device companies underwent mergers and acquisitions, strove to find the most innovative solutions and made calculated decisions in the hopes of achieving long-term success as the market becomes increasingly competitive. So who had the best 2016?

By  Adam Schrag | Becker’s Spine Review

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Swedish scientists successfully implant 3D-printed human cartilage cells in baby mice

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original-01720096-201702000-00013-ff3In what could potentially serve as an important moment in the quest to 3D-print body parts, a team of scientists from Sweden’s Sahlgrenska Academy and Chalmers University of Technology have managed to successfully implant human cartilage cells in six-week-old baby mice.

The researchers created a gel composed of human cartilage cells, printed it through a CELLINK 3D bioprinter and implanted the material inside the lab mice. Once implanted, the tissue began to grow and proliferate inside the animal, eventually vascularizing, with blood vessels growing inside the implanted material. After two months, the material began to more closely resemble human cartilage, which was further stimulated with the addition of stem cells.

The team worked with local plastic surgeons to implant the material, which could one day be used to create more natural implants for patients who have lost ears, noses or knees due to accidents or diseases like cancer.

By  | TechCrunch

Image Credit: TechCrunch

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Spinal Orthopedics: PhD Student at Stevens Institute of Technology Creates 3D Printed Scaffolds at 8 Cents Each

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Spinal-scaffoldThere are so many things we can 3D print today, from entire homes and cars to integral parts being created today in nearly every industry, from aerospace to apparel. The medical field, however, has benefited from countless 3D printed innovations—with many of them pertaining to scaffolds meant for various purposes and often aiding in tissue and bone growth.

The overall benefits of 3D printing continue to be proven by those using the technology all over the world, demonstrating self-sustainability in manufacturing as well as allowing for products that could not have been created before due to a range of hardware, software, materials, and textures. And while some products may be expensive to produce en masse via 3D printing, often affordability is a major part of the equation—offering stunning savings. This is certainly the case with a new 3D printed plastic scaffold that costs a mere eight cents to 3D print, and may be able to promote bone growth at a more accelerated rate.

By  | 3D PRINT.COM

Image Credit: Stevens Institute of Technology

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Ian McDermott Discusses Patient-Specific Prostheses and 3D Printing for Knee Surgery

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Conformis-kneeIan McDermott is a Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon and Founder of London Sports Orthopaedics. Ian was the youngest Elected Council Member and Trustee in the history of The Royal College of Surgeons and he currently holds an Honorary Professorship at Brunel University, London, in the School of Sport & Education. Ian specializes exclusively in knee surgery, and he is a designated ‘Center of Excellence’ for meniscal transplantation and also for the use of biological glues in cartilage replacement. Ian also specializes in high-performance partial and total knee replacement surgery, and in 2012 he was the first surgeon in the U.K. to implant a ConforMIS G2 patient-specific knee prosthesis. Ian has completed over 100 ConforMIS cases to-date, and he is now part of the ConforMIS Surgical Visitation Program, teaching other surgeons how to implant patient-specific knee prostheses.

By Tom Peach | medGadget

Image Credit: ConforMIS

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Stratasys introduce 3D printers to hospitals in five states to help US veterans

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140114113712-military-pensions-disabled-veterans-620xa-906x565In an agreement with the US Department of Veterans Affairs Center for Innovation (VACI), Israeli 3D printer manufacturer Stratasys (NASDAQ:SSYS) is installing 3D printers in five Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals around the nation. The 3D printers will be used to help plan surgical operations, train medical students, and produce functional prosthesis for patients in need.

The project is part of Stratasys’ Corporate Social Responsibility that “is aimed at ingraining the power of 3D printing across young minds, bringing transformative medical and educational programs to underprivileged communities, and creating life-changing impacts for the people who need it most.”

By Beau Jackson | 3D Printing Industry

Photo Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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Here’s What Convinced a Heart Surgeon to Use 3D Printing

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C6a-4YPWQAAYg6KDr. Sloane Guy thought 3D printing models was just a gimmick, until he held one in his hands.

When I walked into Dr. Sloane Guy’s office Tuesday morning, he and a cardiac surgery nurse practitioner were surveying a detailed 3D image on his computer screen. It was a CT scan of a patient’s heart. As Guy, an open heart surgeon, manipulated the image on the screen he and Amber Lennon, the nurse practitioner, discussed whether the patient would be a good candidate for robotic surgery, Guy’s specialty. The other option would be the old-fashioned way, which would require a sternotomy, colloquially known as “cracking open the ribcage.” They opted for the latter.

“We’ll just have to let him know that this is the reason we do these studies, to look for things that may make him non ideal [for robotic surgery],” said Guy, who’s also an associate professor at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York. “There’s nothing wrong with a sternotomy. What’s important is that we get him through surgery safely.”

By Kaleigh Rogers | MOTHERBOARD

 Image Credit: Kaleigh Rogers/Motherboard

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Doctors turn to 3D printing to source medical supplies in earthquake-recovering Nepal

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8317820-3x2-700x467Until recently, staff at the health clinic in Bhotechaur village, in Nepal’s Sindhupalchowk region, had no way to examine their patients’ ears for signs of infection.

While otoscopes might be a common medical item in the West, for remote mountain hospitals in Nepal, sourcing such equipment can be next to impossible.

But when Nepalese engineer Ram Chandra Thapa heard about the problems facing the Bhotechaur clinic, he realised he could offer a simple solution.

He specialises in 3D printing, so he designed and printed a plastic otoscope.

“All the doctors and medical practitioners … they are happy with our [3D-printed] equipment,” Mr Thapa said.

“The items that we develop using 3D printers are cheaper, and they can be made in the field.”

Mr Thapa works for Field Ready, a US-based non-profit organisation that specialises in 3D printing plastic equipment for humanitarian and emergency situations.

By Nick Parkin | ABC (AU)

Image Credit: Nick Parkin

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