joint replacement

Ian McDermott Discusses Patient-Specific Prostheses and 3D Printing for Knee Surgery

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Conformis-kneeIan McDermott is a Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon and Founder of London Sports Orthopaedics. Ian was the youngest Elected Council Member and Trustee in the history of The Royal College of Surgeons and he currently holds an Honorary Professorship at Brunel University, London, in the School of Sport & Education. Ian specializes exclusively in knee surgery, and he is a designated ‘Center of Excellence’ for meniscal transplantation and also for the use of biological glues in cartilage replacement. Ian also specializes in high-performance partial and total knee replacement surgery, and in 2012 he was the first surgeon in the U.K. to implant a ConforMIS G2 patient-specific knee prosthesis. Ian has completed over 100 ConforMIS cases to-date, and he is now part of the ConforMIS Surgical Visitation Program, teaching other surgeons how to implant patient-specific knee prostheses.

By Tom Peach | medGadget

Image Credit: ConforMIS

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The robotic have-not: How J&J plans to woo hospitals, knee surgeons

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GettyImages-165533204-600x426Johnson & Johnson and Verily Life Sciences (formerly Google Life Sciences) have a joint venture to create the next generation of robotic surgery souped up with digital technologies in the future. (Watch out Intuitive Surgical.)

But when it comes to hip and knee replacement today, J&J Depuy Synthes is a robotic have-not.

Competitors have robots or are close to having something robotic in joint replacement.

On Tuesday, Stryker launched its total knee application on the expensive Mako robotduring the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons in San Diego. That same day at AAOS, Smith & Nephew previewed its hand-held robot-assisted device for total knee replacements in advance of a market release in the second quarter. And Zimmer-Biomet was also proudly displaying its robot on the exhibit floor — the Rosa robot acquired with the purchase of French firm Medtech SA – although the robot won’t be doing total knee replacements until 2018.

By Arundhati Parmar | MedCity News

Image Credit: Getty Images

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Zimmer Biomet shoots for robot-assisted total knee release next year

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zblogoZimmer Biomet (NYSE:ZBH) expects to launch a robot-assisted surgery platform for total knee procedures during the 2nd half of 2018, the company said this week at the annual conference of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons in San Diego.

A prototype of the device, on display at the AOSS conference, is based on the Rosa technology Zimmer Biomet acquired when it put up $132 million for Medtech in July 2016. Montpellier, France-based Medtech developed the Rosa Brain and Rosa Spine robot-assisted surgery platforms; the Rosa Spine device won 510(k) clearance from the FDA early last year. Both Rosa systems have CE Mark approval in the European Union.

Zimmer Biomet is hoping to land 510(k) approval from the FDA for a Rosa device for total knee procedures by the 2nd half of 2018, according to Leerink Partners analyst Richard Newitter. The company will also pursue 510(k) clearance for partial knee and hip indications, Newitter wrote today in a note to investors.

By Brad Perriello | MassDevice

Image Credit: Zimmer Biomet

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Stryker launches Mako robotic platform total-knee application

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stryker-mako-7x4Stryker (NYSE:SYK) said today it launched the robotic-arm assisted total knee arthroplasty application for use with its Mako System, touting it as the 1st and only robotic technology which can be used for total knee, hip and partial knee replacement procedures.

The Kalamazoo, Mich.-based company’s Mako Total Knee utilizes both Stryker’s robotic platform and its Triathlon Total Knee System, guided through CT-based 3D modeling of bone anatomy which allows physicians to create personalized surgical plans for each patient’s anatomy. The system also allows for intra-operative planning and assists in bone resectioning procedures, Stryker said.

“We are excited to be leading the transformation of the orthopaedics industry with the commercial launch of the Mako Total Knee application. We believe that pairing our Mako robotic-arm technology with our market leading implant systems will enable surgeons to have an improved surgical experience,” Stryker joint replacement division prez Bill Huffnagle said in a press release.

By Fink Densford | MassDevice

Image Credit: MassDevice

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A doctor with a bad knee runs into one-size-fits-all medicine

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myleftknee01It took me three months of physical torture before I diagnosed my problem: I was suffering from one-size-fits-all medicine.

I am one of more than 750,000 Americans who this year will have a total knee replacement, the most common orthopedic operation. Most people do well with the standard physical therapy protocol, but there are many who have a rough rehab.

My knees went bad as a teenager because of OCD — not obsessive-compulsive disorder, but a rare condition known as osteochondritis dissecans. It wreaked havoc on both knees with plenty of pain and frequent dislocations, ultimately leading to extensive surgery just before I started medical school at age 20.

Over the next four decades, I progressively curtailed activities including running, hiking, tennis and even elliptical exercise, while increasing my reliance on anti-inflammatory medications to deal with the pain. After injections of steroids and synovial fluid directly into the joint failed, it was time to consider getting a new knee. My orthopedist told me I was a “perfect candidate” being relatively young (I was 62), thin and fit; he said the only concern would be a risk — 1 to 2 percent — of infection. Nothing else.

By Eric Topol | The Washington Post

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Why This Robotic Medical Device Belongs In a Museum

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bargarwilliamrobodoc-750Two and a half years ago, employees at THINK Surgical, a robotic surgery development company in Fremont, California, were cleaning out a storage unit near their headquarters when they found an object that appeared to be an old robot arm.

Upon closer look, Micah Forstein, an assistant manager at the company, realized that the arm was a remnant—a prototype of an invention that had changed joint replacement surgery forever.

Called the Robodoc, the innovative robotic system allows surgeons to perform complicated hip and knee surgeries with greater precision using CT scans converted into three-dimensional virtual images for preoperative planning and computer-guided drilling. The tool has been used in more than 28,000 procedures worldwide.

Now, the fully recovered 1989 prototype will be forever memorialized in the collections of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

“It’s important for us to remember milestones in medical technology,” says Forstein.

The robot is the brainchild of the late veterinarian Howard “Hap” A. Paul and engineer-turned-orthopedic surgeon William Bargar, who were both working at the University of California, Davis, in the 1980s when Bargar recognized what he calls a dilemma in total hip arthroplasty, or hip replacement surgery.

By Katie Nodjimbadem | Smithsonian

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Zimmer Biomet unveils personalized total knee implant

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vanguard_id-_3Zimmer Biomet launched a new total knee implant, the first of its kind to incorporate two polyethylene bearings on the medial and lateral sides of the device rather than just one polyethylene piece between the metal components of the implant.

“I believe that our newly released Vanguard Individualized Design will revolutionize total knee replacement. With the ability to fine tune the knee’s balance through the use of independent medial and lateral bearing thickness and constraint options, we will arm the surgeon with the ultimate soft tissue respecting capability,” said Todd Davis, vice president and general manager of Zimmer Biomet’s global knee business, in a statement.

The Vanguard Individualized Design is a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) device that allows surgeons to mix and match bearing shapes and thicknesses to match their patients’ individual anatomies, according to the statement. This personalized approach enables a better fit while preserving soft tissue around the joint. The new implant is a follow-up to the company’s original Vanguard Knee system, launched in 2003.

By Amirah Al Idrus | FierceBiotech

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